CHI2013: Saturday April 27

CCIjournal

On Saturday there was a workshop on Methods of Working with Teenagers in Interaction Design, where I presented a paper: Adapting Co-Constructing Stories to the Mindset of Teenagers. Other papers from that workshop include:

These and other papers will also feature in the next issue of the new International Journal of Child-Computer Interaction.

workshop

Paper: Adapting Co-Constructing Stories to the Mindset of Teenagers

Check out my latest publication!

Adapting Co-Constructing Stories

Book: Nurture Shock – Review

Nurtureshock: Why Everything We Thought About Children is Wrong – Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman

This review is only about Chapter 2, since that is about sleep, which is the subject of my current project. The other chapters are equally interesting though! In the chapter ‘The Lost Hour’, the authors describe how children today sleep one hour less than they did 30 years ago and how that impacts their wellbeing.

Like in several scientific papers I read on this subject, it is stated here that a high percentage of high-schoolers feel sleepy during school, their grades drop because of that, and some fall asleep in class. They go as far as to say that the average amount of sleep a child in high school gets, is only 6,5 hours!

The causes for this lack of sleep are the usual suspects: full schedules, early school start times, adolescent circadian clock shifts. Not much time is spend describing possible solutions for this lack of sleep, other than that teenagers who went to bed earlier, got more sleep; their IQ went up and so did their grades. But how to motivate teenagers to go to bed early?

Then an interesting part about adolescents. For reference, I looked up the definition of adolescence in several sources. I was disappointed to find no watertight definition of it, other than some rather vague descriptions without much overlap. The World Health Organisation defines adolescence as the period between 10 and 20 years of age. In the US, adolescent age is often defined as between 13 and 24.

Brown’s Mary Carskadon has demonstrated that during puberty, the circadian system – the biological clock – does a ‘phase shift’ that keeps adolescents up later. In prepubescents and grownups, when it gets dark outside, the brain produces melatonin, which makes us sleepy, But adolescent brains don’t release melatonin for another 90 minutes. So even if teenagers are in bed at 10 p.m. (which they aren’t), they lie awake, staring at the ceiling.

Several experiments with pushing back school start times and letting teens sleep longer, have yielded better results on SAT tests. And interestingly, also typical modern puberescent behaviours like moodiness, depression and binge eating go down with more sleep. Could it be that todays teenagers act out more because of their lack of sleep? The authors of Nurtureshock certainly believe so.

Another side effect of sleep deprivation is an increased chance of becoming obese. Hormone levels change with sleep loss, increasing the feeling of hunger and favouring storage of fat. Furthermore, when you sleep less, you are tired during the day, so you are less likely to have an active lifestyle on top of being hungry. Plus, when you are asleep, you are not eating!

For my research, physical health could be an interesting aspect to define benefits of the proposed nap with. Next to factors like daytime sleepiness, moodiness and cognitive abilities, physical health is important. It would be good to incorporate some measure of that, be it weight, blood pressure or resting heart rate.

Teen Sleep article- Review

Review of article: ‘Teen sleep: Why is your teen so tired?’– Mayo Clinic

A good introduction to the problem of adolescent sleep problems, although this article speaks of ‘teens’ where ‘adolescence’ can sometimes mean from 10 to 23 years old.

“puberty changes a teen’s internal clock, delaying the time he or she starts feeling sleepy — often until 11 p.m. or later. Staying up late to study or socialize can disrupt a teen’s internal clock even more” Continue reading

Analysis of All Research

In this video, you can see four teenagers talking about their lives and evaluating classic Light Scribing.The most interesting conclusions of these conversations are described next.
On their life in general:
  • these teenagers spend a lot of their free time with friends, outside the house, and communicating with friends, sometimes at the same time
  • they are communicating mostly via social media using text, photos, movies; and real-life talking
  • subjects are: other friends, documenting experiences, seeing something beautiful or funny Continue reading

A Recap of Two User Evaluation Sessions

Finally, it’s here! A condensed video showing the most interesting outcomes of two User Evaluation sessions about the Light Scribing concept.

Second User Evaluation: Light Scribing Pictures

A slideshow of some of the pictures made in this second session:

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Second User Evaluation of Light Scribing

One week after the first user evaluation, we held another evaluation session. One reason to do this was to see if the technique would still be interesting after some time, and if users would be prepared to keep using it.

All four students in this project were present, and some had prepared special hand-held lights to use. On top of that we had the use of a more advanced camera that could do longer shutter times. Three of the four original users were present as well.

Continue reading

Light Scribing Try-out Pictures

Have a look at the slide show!

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Experiencing Light Scribing

Some videos made during the User Research session I had with 4 teenagers aged between 12 and 18. I used the Co-Creating Stories technique as described by Derya Ozcelik.

Part 1: We watched a music video-like clip of teenagers hanging around, talking to friends, playing sports etc. Then we talk about our own experiences and this recording starts. Continue reading